Hueman Resources Podcast Channel

Episode 002: Real Talk on Talent | Core Values & Company Culture

March 14, 2024 Talent Acquisition, Recruiting, & All Things Hiring Episode 2
Hueman Resources Podcast Channel
Episode 002: Real Talk on Talent | Core Values & Company Culture
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Dina and Hilary dive into 'Culture by Design' in talent acquisition and unpack the transformative power of core values. Expect to unravel the fabric of organizational identity as we dissect the critical role of aligning behaviors with a company's ethos and celebrate the unique ways in which Hueman's core values shape our vibrant culture every day. Get an insider's look at crafting a company vibe that resonates with both employees and customers.

Navigate the intersection of organizational culture and personal strengths, delving into the evolution and impact of cultural identity on job satisfaction. Learn insights on how cultures can evolve from employee initiatives and how this evolution touches every facet of the workplace.

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Hilary:

Welcome to Real Talk on Talent, a human resources podcast where we talk about talent acquisition, recruiting and all things hiring. Hi Dina, hi Hillary, welcome back, thank you. You've been traveling a lot lately. I have been Tell me about that. What are you up to?

Dina:

I've been going to lots of different conferences. I was in Miami, san Diego, I was in Miami. I'm pushing for a conference in Hawaii. You really should go to Hawaii. Aren't you facilitating a panel here soon? I will be. Yes, I will be at the PEI conference in New York. I will be facilitating a panel on recruiting frontline staff or private equity back to companies.

Hilary:

That's amazing. That's really exciting. I'm looking forward to it. Cannot wait to hear more about that. It should be a good one, Awesome. Today we're talking about people. We are Specifically before we get into our topic of culture and culture by design and core values. I do want to recognize that you, as a wonderful person, were just recognized by RPOA. Yay, thank you, you got an award for being what Influential Woman in RPO? I believe. So, yes, you believe. Yes. Put that on your LinkedIn profile.

Dina:

I will, yeah, I think I already did so, check me out Dina DeMarco LinkedIn. At LinkedIncom, at LinkedIncom. That's how LinkedIn works.

Hilary:

Dang it, yeah, all right. So how do you want to jump into?

Dina:

culture. So I think let's start big picture and then let's go backwards Tell me what culture is. Okay, so, wow gosh, you say it that way and I think we need to start the other way. No, so you know, I think that culture is.

Hilary:

It is the organizational vibes I love that that's actually the easiest way to describe it, and when we talk about organizational vibes, it feels very like what's the right word, like amorphous, okay.

Dina:

Maybe that's the right word.

Hilary:

I was like I was going to say hippie-dippy, but that didn't seem quite right. But here at Human we talk about culture by design all the time, and so I would love for your thoughts on when you say culture is a company's vibe, but then we talk about a culture by design. How do those two things work together? Yeah?

Dina:

great question. So at Human, we are super prescriptive about our culture and we are focused on having, you know, a great employment experience, and so when we think about our culture, it is a result of our core values, and we have decided to really embrace our core values, knowing that those core values really dictate the workplace culture. And so if you hold true to your core values in the way you operate and also bringing people on board who match your core values, you will have control of your culture. So you really have the ability to design your culture.

Hilary:

I would say you don't have control of your culture, you're right, but you can be thoughtful in making sure that it is the type of culture that is correct for your company. Very well said.

Dina:

Yeah, I would agree with that.

Hilary:

Because and I love that you talked about like the core value piece of it, because one thing that I struggle a lot with is when people talk about culture-based hiring, it can often and I've mentioned this many times before but it can sound like oh, do you look like me? Do you sound like me? Do we come from the same background? Which is not a great way to build a company and have, like you know, not just from a DEI standpoint, but just from bringing in the best people. And so the way that we think about it is you have your core values. How do those core values show up in behavior? And then find people who value those same things or whose behaviors reflect those same core values? So then everyone's working to the same goal, and that is where the culture is consistent, even though it shows up differently for the different people. Yeah, I think you nailed that Perfect. I do think we need to take a moment and acknowledge humans. Core values, yes, okay, so they are excellence, teamwork, trust, change, service. Is that it? Did I get?

Dina:

five, that's it five. I was counting on my fingers, only the ones I was saying Okay, I want to actually.

Hilary:

Can I give a quick example Please?

Whitney:

Okay.

Hilary:

So at Human we talk about like teamwork, and one of the ways that that is defined for human is that you participate in our company culture, you actively participate in our company culture, and so human Halloween is a huge deal. Like everyone gets super dressed up. It's very silly. You are the queen of Halloween. Two-time winner here. Yeah, you are the two-time winner. I don't like that. It makes me super uncomfortable, but I do show up. But, more importantly, I am now the official photographer for the like longest running street costume winners and so like that is a great example of you could say, oh, you have to be silly and join in this way, but I am embraced because I participate, even if it's not that stereotypical.

Dina:

So I absolutely love that, and that is really where participation and values differs in so many different ways and it is how you look at values and you figure out what are different ways people can participate in them, and so I love that. I think you yeah, I just a marketer who doesn't really like Halloween.

Hilary:

I don't know if that's an anomaly or weird little weird but I support people in their joy so I'm here for it. There we go. So tell me, dina, in your opinion, ta leaders Uh huh. Where do they sometimes miss the mark or where is there an opportunity they may not be thinking about, as it relates to culture by design?

Dina:

Yeah, so you know, I think this is larger than TA leaders.

Whitney:

Oh, I think this is.

Dina:

Completely Organizational. I think it's super important that companies understand what cultures are important to them and so it's really in or what core values are important to them, let me say that. So I think it's really important that companies take a step back and they define their core values. When you understand what your core values are, you can then begin to integrate those into your hiring process and your selection process, and so to me, that is when I think of the recruitment part of culture and core values it's really understanding. How can you make sure that your interview and selection process is looking for those core values and so you know?

Dina:

Just simple things like here we teamwork is one of our core values, so when we're interviewing people, it's important that we understand how they work on teams, you know, and so we want to ask questions around what was their previous experience on teams? How were their teammates rank them? All those type of things. So I think that's just an opportunity in general and it is really part of the talent acquisition team to make sure that they are including those core values in the screening process.

Hilary:

I love that and I also want to point out I think you and I have only talked about teamwork, because you and I love working on a team together.

Dina:

We do. Yeah, we're always very fun team.

Hilary:

What is your favorite human core value? Change, change. Yes, mine is excellence.

Dina:

I love putting in good work. Yeah, no, I love. I like to do something and then move on. Do it and move on. You get bored if you don't keep changing up. So I'm a maximizer. Is that what they call it?

Hilary:

Like you, oh yeah from the skills finder, strengths finders, strengths finders. I think we need that's going to have to come out in the correction section. Yeah, that will yes.

Dina:

All right, but I'm a maximizer. So what that means is that you know I'll get something to a point and then I want to change it and make it better. Love that. So, because of that, change is my favorite core value.

Hilary:

Okay, mine's strategic, that's my like, skill strength, whatever. But okay, speaking of change, I'm making a weird pivot here. Okay, we talked about identifying core values, yes, so what I would like to do for just a second is say okay, let's say you are an organization, you have a specific culture, but maybe you don't know how to define it, or maybe your culture has gotten ahead of you and the culture is determining, as opposed to, like the company, determining what's going on. Yeah, where should people start? Like, how do you start in under the? I'm just gonna leave it generic.

Dina:

So, you know, I think it's really important to look across your organization and look at the people in your organization who you want to work with on a daily basis and see what are the values that they bring to work every day. You know, look across the organization and in every department, up and down the org chart, ask people and try to identify what are common core values that people are bringing. So, I think you can already look within your company and see which values resonate amongst your existing team and ask people.

Hilary:

Yes, I completely agree. I also think it's important to have it rooted in reality. Yeah, so even if you feel like your culture is not I don't know the right way to say this, I've kind of said it three different ways In order to design your culture, you have to start where you are today. Correct, because if you say, okay, our culture is X, y and Z, but now we want our core values to be all the way down to the other end of the alphabet, the change management to get people bought into that new culture is going to be astronomical and you're going to lose everyone.

Dina:

Yeah, you can put the cart before the horse. You know, core values dictate the culture.

Hilary:

So, but then also core values come out of the values that exist in your culture today, correct. So it's like you have to look at your world and say what are the positive things that we see? Are there ones that we want to add to that? Are there ones that we want to be better at? And start there and then have that be your culture by design. Yeah, yeah, I love culture. I think that it's so. I think it's the best way to get people bought in is if they're bought in to the experience. I know that. Okay, I know the mission of a company is extremely important and that is something I don't want to devalue at all. I think mission is part of the overall culture, but to me, the culture is that day to day experience, and that is so much more influential. I say that because I don't know how strongly I feel this, but the culture is more influential in the day to day than the mission. Generally speaking, like would be my opinion.

Dina:

I would agree with that. I would agree with that. You know, you come into an office every day and one thing I say about human is when I'm talking to potential partners, I say you will like working with us? Yes, we are generally likeable, nice people you will like working with us.

Hilary:

We are always likeable fun people Dina, not generally Generally.

Dina:

But you know, it's true though that goes to our culture, you come in here, everybody's smiling. Everybody says hello, you know, and that goes to the culture and it's an inviting, it's a warm and inviting workplace.

Hilary:

I will say, though, we are real. We are real. We're real because you say oh, we're always warm and smiling. It sounds a little bit like Stepford Wives, but it's real, we're real. Yeah, we'll just brag on human for a minute there, why not?

Dina:

I've been here 15 years. I'm going to brag.

Hilary:

I'm very impressed by that.

Dina:

Yeah, thank you.

Hilary:

Can you tell Actually?

Dina:

I do want to ask this.

Hilary:

In the 15 years that you have been at human. Have you seen the culture evolve in that time? Or can you kind of give us an example of someone who's been with an organization for that long? How has the culture changed? Or gotten better as we've, gotten, bigger as we've? You know, walk me through that?

Dina:

Yeah, yeah, great question. So you know, when I joined Human, I think we were probably about 100 employees and at that point 90% of the people who worked there were referrals, so everybody kind of knew everybody. And it wasn't until we hit a growth spurt a couple years later that we really had the opportunity to bring in people who were totally new to the organization, and so I loved the outside influences in the different individuals that we were able to bring in. And so what I've loved seeing about our culture grow is kind of different pockets and groups of people and how they're showing up and embracing each other. So we have things like the book club, yes, you know, and these are all employee-led groups. So I've loved seeing our culture and the different groups kind of pop up and everybody can find a home.

Hilary:

Yeah, it gives so much more texture and depth and just value to an organization. And I do want to say the reason that culture is so important and being thoughtful and purposeful. And all of this is not just so people can enjoy showing up, but because people, when they show up and they enjoy being there and they can bring their best self to work, that's when the organization is really going to be successful. Absolutely, people are going to work together better, they're going to be able to work through problems, they're going to be willing to go that extra mile to make the difference.

Dina:

I mean, there are studies after studies that we know that when employees are engaged, organizations thrive, and so good workplace culture increases employee engagement.

Hilary:

Well, that's why the Gallup 12 survey is so universally accepted as a good measurement for employee engagement and therefore a successful work environment, because when people are engaged, then they're going to do better work.

Dina:

Like.

Hilary:

Gallup doesn't ask anything other than what one individual thinks about their own work experience, and that has been a universal standard for exceptionalism in business. Well, I think we're right.

Dina:

So culture, values correction section.

Hilary:

We've got a new section of the podcast called the correction section. Technically it's.

Dina:

Correction section. I've always wanted to sing on there.

Hilary:

Also just for the viewers and listeners who don't know. I'm especially proud of Dina for this, because she was cut from her third grade choir, so the fact she's singing for us today is just lovely.

Dina:

Thank you. I know it Listen, it took a lot. Thank you for bringing your talents today. Thank you, thank you.

Hilary:

This is excellence and you've served us all rolled into one. Listen, I try my best. It's awesome.

Dina:

I try my best.

Hilary:

The seriousness the correction section is we had a couple of things we talked about in our last podcast where we need to address them. The first and I've actually had a couple of people reach out to me about this is Dived vs Dove, and both are correct. For those curious, dived and Dove are, let's see. Now I'm not going to forget, dove is more common in North American English Okay, and Dived is more common in European English Okay.

Dina:

So here we go. I would like to correct something Hillary said. That's just rude, they're all being done for the bus. Hillary was claiming that hot takes came out. The term hot takes came out around in the 90s. It just feels right. It really got popular around 2012, and this is according to Webster. So if they're, that's what the story is.

Hilary:

Merriam Webster, are you incarnating things too? Do you know what's going on over there? Okay, but fair. Okay, hot takes the 90s thing. It's actually 2012.

Dina:

2012 thing. So there we go. I know that, okay, great.

Hilary:

Well, speaking of which, it's now time for hot takes on hot topics.

Dina:

Okay.

Hilary:

So we're going to do shout out to Whitney. If you could give us today's prompt please.

Whitney:

Well, I don't know about you ladies, but I am a big fan of the Baconator. But my opinions are starting to change, Frosty.

Hilary:

Frosty, oh yeah.

Whitney:

You may feel differently about them. The Wendy's, as we know them, are talking about doing prize surges during the year. Parts of the day.

Hilary:

Are they surging during the day or are they dropping it down when it's less busy?

Whitney:

I believe they are surging, and the CEO has hence tried to withdraw these statements, but I would love to know your opinion on the matter.

Dina:

I've thought a lot about this.

Whitney:

I've gotten a lot of people frosty, if I would put it.

Dina:

Whitney, you're going to be sassy. There we go. Oh, I love it.

Hilary:

You should have done the air quotes in front of the camera so everyone could have seen that that was great.

Dina:

That was great. So first of all, huge Wendy's fan. I love Wendy's Spicy chicken sandwich, can't beat it. I've got to say I really just go for their fries and the frosties, okay, I mean, well, that's a classic combo, for sure. So I've actually thought about this quite a bit and I think this is. I think Wendy's went wrong in the positioning and marketing of this. They're trying to get fancy here. You guys aren't Uber. Okay, I'm not going to pay more.

Hilary:

Keep going For something completely agreeing with you right now.

Dina:

Okay, this is the agreement finger. Okay, I thought it was the disagreement. I got worried, so I'm going to keep it simple here. Yeah, restaurants, do you know what restaurants have Food? They have the early bird special and happy hour. Oh, you're being specific. I am being very specific, okay, so don't come up with surge pricing or demand based pricing.

Hilary:

Listen, wendy's, if you want to have different pricing schedules, have your early bird schedule or early bird special and your happy hour, which you know is fair, because what you're saying is based off of the expectation that people have Exactly that. It's consistent you get what you get. So I have two things on this, Okay. One is maybe we're just old. When I first heard about Uber, when I first heard about Uber, I was like who the heck is going to want to get in some stranger's car here? About Airbnb, I'm like why would you go rent a stranger's home, Like it was so out of our frame of reference? Now I cannot imagine life without Uber, and maybe there's something here you know. Yeah, no, okay.

Hilary:

Because maybe just saying I don't know. The other thing I'll say is from a people standpoint, I think that it could be really beneficial if you think about your employees or the customer experience, Because if the whole point of it was, from my understanding, to give a more consistent stream of individuals so you don't have these just slammed busy like times, was this done because they're having a hard time filling their positions so they could have fewer people to manage those shifts? So did it come from that? That's a great call.

Dina:

And I like how you looped that back to people. It's what I'm here for. It's called marketing man. Really good, but no great call Interesting.

Hilary:

Yeah, there you go, perfect. Thank you everyone for being here. Hey, what are we talking about next time? Technology. No process, process.

Dina:

Yes, process is next time. Yes, process is next time. We're very excited, we're very excited.

Hilary:

We'll talk about process. There we go. Thanks everyone, bye, bye.

Culture by Design in Talent Acquisition
Exploring Organizational Culture and Values
Discussion on People and Processes